| baseball scoring luxury design download print 6 notes
Download the AE Luxury Scorecards here.
I’ve recently been turned on to scoring baseball games. It involves intricate note-taking, pens and attention to detail (i.e. just the right thing for me.) I was a bit stressed though, having to use the provided scoresheet in the program. It was too small to allow for any flourishes of the pen whatsoever and did not keep track of how many hot dogs and beer I consumed or how many high-fives I gave out or got. This is why I chose to make my own.
Not to mince words - this is the Cadillac of scoresheets. Each team has two 8.5x11 sheets of luxurious score-keeping real estate. I’ve added in special marks too, like whether a pitcher is a lefty or righty, an icon for pitcher change (oh so important to note to keep accurate pitcher stats), and most importantly, a wonderfully large at-bat cell, with room to draw hit trajectories and cleanly label out sequences. If you don’t really care about size, you can always look to the wonderful Eephus League package, but I needed a bit more room and details.
You can download the AE Luxury Scorecards here. Hope you like ‘em. Feel free to drop me a line if you have any questions, concerns or suggestions on the set.
Download the AE Luxury Scorecards here.
I’ve recently been turned on to scoring baseball games. It involves intricate note-taking, pens and attention to detail (i.e. just the right thing for me.) I was a bit stressed though, having to use the provided scoresheet in the program. It was too small to allow for any flourishes of the pen whatsoever and did not keep track of how many hot dogs and beer I consumed or how many high-fives I gave out or got. This is why I chose to make my own.
Not to mince words - this is the Cadillac of scoresheets. Each team has two 8.5x11 sheets of luxurious score-keeping real estate. I’ve added in special marks too, like whether a pitcher is a lefty or righty, an icon for pitcher change (oh so important to note to keep accurate pitcher stats), and most importantly, a wonderfully large at-bat cell, with room to draw hit trajectories and cleanly label out sequences. If you don’t really care about size, you can always look to the wonderful Eephus League package, but I needed a bit more room and details.
You can download the AE Luxury Scorecards here. Hope you like ‘em. Feel free to drop me a line if you have any questions, concerns or suggestions on the set.
Download the AE Luxury Scorecards here.
I’ve recently been turned on to scoring baseball games. It involves intricate note-taking, pens and attention to detail (i.e. just the right thing for me.) I was a bit stressed though, having to use the provided scoresheet in the program. It was too small to allow for any flourishes of the pen whatsoever and did not keep track of how many hot dogs and beer I consumed or how many high-fives I gave out or got. This is why I chose to make my own.
Not to mince words - this is the Cadillac of scoresheets. Each team has two 8.5x11 sheets of luxurious score-keeping real estate. I’ve added in special marks too, like whether a pitcher is a lefty or righty, an icon for pitcher change (oh so important to note to keep accurate pitcher stats), and most importantly, a wonderfully large at-bat cell, with room to draw hit trajectories and cleanly label out sequences. If you don’t really care about size, you can always look to the wonderful Eephus League package, but I needed a bit more room and details.
You can download the AE Luxury Scorecards here. Hope you like ‘em. Feel free to drop me a line if you have any questions, concerns or suggestions on the set.
Download the AE Luxury Scorecards here.
I’ve recently been turned on to scoring baseball games. It involves intricate note-taking, pens and attention to detail (i.e. just the right thing for me.) I was a bit stressed though, having to use the provided scoresheet in the program. It was too small to allow for any flourishes of the pen whatsoever and did not keep track of how many hot dogs and beer I consumed or how many high-fives I gave out or got. This is why I chose to make my own.
Not to mince words - this is the Cadillac of scoresheets. Each team has two 8.5x11 sheets of luxurious score-keeping real estate. I’ve added in special marks too, like whether a pitcher is a lefty or righty, an icon for pitcher change (oh so important to note to keep accurate pitcher stats), and most importantly, a wonderfully large at-bat cell, with room to draw hit trajectories and cleanly label out sequences. If you don’t really care about size, you can always look to the wonderful Eephus League package, but I needed a bit more room and details.
You can download the AE Luxury Scorecards here. Hope you like ‘em. Feel free to drop me a line if you have any questions, concerns or suggestions on the set.

Download the AE Luxury Scorecards here.

I’ve recently been turned on to scoring baseball games. It involves intricate note-taking, pens and attention to detail (i.e. just the right thing for me.) I was a bit stressed though, having to use the provided scoresheet in the program. It was too small to allow for any flourishes of the pen whatsoever and did not keep track of how many hot dogs and beer I consumed or how many high-fives I gave out or got. This is why I chose to make my own.

Not to mince words - this is the Cadillac of scoresheets. Each team has two 8.5x11 sheets of luxurious score-keeping real estate. I’ve added in special marks too, like whether a pitcher is a lefty or righty, an icon for pitcher change (oh so important to note to keep accurate pitcher stats), and most importantly, a wonderfully large at-bat cell, with room to draw hit trajectories and cleanly label out sequences. If you don’t really care about size, you can always look to the wonderful Eephus League package, but I needed a bit more room and details.

You can download the AE Luxury Scorecards here. Hope you like ‘em. Feel free to drop me a line if you have any questions, concerns or suggestions on the set.

| Illustration design wedding invite print 226 notes
This spring I was asked to create a suite of wedding collateral for Meg & Mike. I worked up a few invites, some table cards, and even a stencil for a special wedding brew. It was an ultimate pleasure creating this package for a super sweet couple. Check out more of the work from the wedding right here!
This spring I was asked to create a suite of wedding collateral for Meg & Mike. I worked up a few invites, some table cards, and even a stencil for a special wedding brew. It was an ultimate pleasure creating this package for a super sweet couple. Check out more of the work from the wedding right here!
This spring I was asked to create a suite of wedding collateral for Meg & Mike. I worked up a few invites, some table cards, and even a stencil for a special wedding brew. It was an ultimate pleasure creating this package for a super sweet couple. Check out more of the work from the wedding right here!

This spring I was asked to create a suite of wedding collateral for Meg & Mike. I worked up a few invites, some table cards, and even a stencil for a special wedding brew. It was an ultimate pleasure creating this package for a super sweet couple. Check out more of the work from the wedding right here!

| illustration comic friend mold design
I launched my first comic of the new year, Friend Mold! It’s been in the works awhile, this comic, and I’m extremely excited to get it out in the world. It was a lot of work, but it has me anxious to get working on another (which I have begun but is still too early to be showing anything. SneakHear: it has a goat). During the process, the toughest design decision was the cover, and it kept changing. I ended up with something quite different from my initial design, which isn’t all that uncommon in the design process, but most of the book’s illustrations were set from the get go. The Friend Mold idea all came from a thought I’d had coming out of sleep one winter morning. I won’t bore you with dream-details, but the thought spawned a concept, a rough script and definite look within a few hours. Here is a look at two alternate cover designs.
The one on the right is closest to my original concept, which had a rubber like pour-mold with swappable head, chest, and crotch pieces. It just never read as well as it should have and the shadowed relief look didn’t fit the interior illustrations. And that always bothers me (pardon to any comic artists out there), where the cover illustration style has little to do with the interior art. The design on the left was just a bit too morbid when I polled some folks about it. While I did like the face down look, it did slowly give me the creeps when working on it. Made me feel very claustrophobic - which also isn’t the point of the book’s content.
So, check it out, and see the book as it is released, a page a day with the final interior on Feb 14th!

I launched my first comic of the new year, Friend Mold! It’s been in the works awhile, this comic, and I’m extremely excited to get it out in the world. It was a lot of work, but it has me anxious to get working on another (which I have begun but is still too early to be showing anything. SneakHear: it has a goat). During the process, the toughest design decision was the cover, and it kept changing. I ended up with something quite different from my initial design, which isn’t all that uncommon in the design process, but most of the book’s illustrations were set from the get go. The Friend Mold idea all came from a thought I’d had coming out of sleep one winter morning. I won’t bore you with dream-details, but the thought spawned a concept, a rough script and definite look within a few hours. Here is a look at two alternate cover designs.

The one on the right is closest to my original concept, which had a rubber like pour-mold with swappable head, chest, and crotch pieces. It just never read as well as it should have and the shadowed relief look didn’t fit the interior illustrations. And that always bothers me (pardon to any comic artists out there), where the cover illustration style has little to do with the interior art. The design on the left was just a bit too morbid when I polled some folks about it. While I did like the face down look, it did slowly give me the creeps when working on it. Made me feel very claustrophobic - which also isn’t the point of the book’s content.

So, check it out, and see the book as it is released, a page a day with the final interior on Feb 14th!

M&M Wedding | portfolio illustration design 8 notes

Invite 1

Meg & Mike, the sweetest couple, asked me to work up a whole graphical package for their summer wedding. It was a real pleasure figuring out which elements represented each of them separately then worked together as a whole package. 

Invite 2

The main double-sided wedding invite contained a mixture of flora from the bride’s and groom’s respective region mixed with some from their wedding location, Ithaca NY.

Invite Back 1

The back of the invite was maybe the funnest part of the project. This hand-written font I worked up really seemed to fit the style of the couple and the mood of their farmer’s market, DIY wedding.

Invite Back 2

Table & Name Card Flora!

Many of the elements I used in the main invite were then used for name and table cards. Here’s a good portion of them all laid out above.

Table Card

Meg & Mike chose passages (sometimes lyrics) to accompany my illustrations on the table cards. 

Name Cards

The illustrations made their way onto name cards the guests could match up with their assigned table. *Photo courtesy Anna Simonak

Brew!

The groom and I even brewed up a special champagne-style beer for the wedding and I hand-cut a stencil and painted the bottles with its fitting batch name.

BBQ Invite

Hello!

This is the blog and portfolio of illustrator and designer austin eustice.

He lives in Brooklyn, makes music, rides bicycles and draws a whole lot everyday. I sell posters and cool things in my shop!

He is currently available for freelance design and illustration.